Where Am I Now?

September 15, 2013

trumanAfter a rewarding post-doctoral fellowship at the Taub Center for Israel Studies at New York University, I am happy to report that I will soon be taking up a new position in Israel.

Beginning in October, I will be a post-doctoral research fellow at the Harry S. Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. To visit my Truman Institute bio page, click here. In addition, I will be teaching a course in the fall at Hebrew University in Israeli Territorial Politics in the Department of International Relations as well as a course in Israeli & American Comparative Politics at University of Haifa in the spring. In short, it promises to be a very interesting and very busy year. Wish me luck.

As with the past year, I expect my updates on this blog to be infrequent, but I will continue to post conference announcements, paper publications, reviews, and thoughts as they seem pressing and relevant. Thank you as always for reading.


Letter to the Editor

August 25, 2013

A particularly inane op-ed has been making the rounds in small town newspapers regarding the current upheaval in Egypt on the subject of American aid the past two weeks including my own hometown paper, the Spokesman-Review of Spokane, Washington.

Written by one John Quigley, a professor emeritus of law at Ohio State University, it makes the argument that the United States should cut military aid to Egypt following its violent crackdown on Muslim Brotherhood protesters. Yet the justification for this move is not to reprimand the military coup for its wanton repression, but to ensure Egypt’s return to a once “united Arab-country front in support of a just accommodation for the Palestinians vis-a-vis Israel.” He reasons that the Camp David Agreement, from which this aid stems and which he believes fractured this unity, “has been disastrous for the cause of peace in the Middle East.”

Aside from the op-ed itself being quite poorly written and reasoned, it conveniently overlooks the fact that 1) the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has little to nothing to do with the current upheaval in Egypt and 2) the period of imagined unity for which the author yearns was one of violently destructive and globally destabilizing interstate warfare.

To the latter point, I offer my response.


Paper at AIS 2013

June 27, 2013

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Earlier this week I presented a paper at the Annual Association for Israel Studies conference at UCLA. The panel was entitled, Emotional and Philosophical Motivations in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict and its Resolution. My paper, in turn, was “Giving Without Receiving? Justifying Unilateral Territorial Withdrawal in Israeli Politics.” If you are interested in the paper or the presentation materials, please let me know. Check out an abstract after the jump.

Read the rest of this entry »


Paper and Panel at ISA 2013

March 28, 2013

Next week, Thursday, April 4 at 1:45 pm, I will be speaking on a panel at the upcoming International Studies Association conference in San Francisco. The panel, entitled “Defending the Homeland: Territory & National Identity,” will explore the idea of homeland as a political, social, and cultural construct and how the definition of such a space impacts state territorial policies.

I am very excited to be joined by six esteemed colleagues from a diverse range of backgrounds, methodologies, and theoretical approaches. After the jump, you can find our panel abstract as well as my own paper abstract. For those of my colleagues, log on to the myISA system and check the annual conference program, or send me an email. Hope to see you in San Francisco!

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Panel and Paper at AJS Conference

December 13, 2012

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Next week, I will be making a quick trip to Chicago for the annual conference of the Association for Jewish Studies from December 16-18.

I am fortunate to be joining a panel of very talented academics including Arnon Golan, Rachel Havrelock, Jacob Lassner, and Yael Zerubavel to discuss the place of the Land of Israel in contemporary Israeli national memory and politics. I have included the panel abstract and my paper abstract after the jump. For a full listing of our panel and the AJS conference in general, click here.

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Symposium: The Two State-Solution: The U.N. Partition of Mandatory Palestine

December 3, 2012

December 4, 2012  1947-UN-Partition-Plan-1949-Armistice-Comparison.svg

5:30pm – 7:30pm
The Two State-Solution: The U.N. Partition of Mandatory Palestine – Analysis and Sources
A Book Event in honor of Prof. Ruth Gavison

Introduction 

Professor Joseph H.H. Weiler

Director, Tikvah Center for Law and Jewish Civilization Joseph Straus Professor of Law, New York University Law School

Discussion

Dr. Ariel Zellman
Schusterman Postdoctoral Fellow, Taub Center for Israel Studies

Prof. Ronald Zweig
Director, Taub Center for Israel Studies

Response

Professor Ruth Gavison
Haim H. Cohn Professor of Human Rights, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Emerita)
Founder / President of Metzilah Center for Zionist, Jewish, Liberal and Humanist Thought
Joint Straus / Tikvah Fellow 2011-12, New York University School of Law

A kosher reception will follow the program.

Location:

53 Washington Square South, Screening Room

RSVP by Tel. (212) 998-8981 / E-mail fas.taubcenter@nyu.edu / seating limited, registration required.


New Year, New Position

September 27, 2012

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Dear readers, it has been a very busy few months with very little activity on this blog. My apologies, but it has been with good reason. In mid-August, I successfully defended my doctoral dissertation, “Security or Identity? Narratives of State & Nation in International Territorial Conflict Protraction” and can now officially call myself a doctor of philosophy. I suppose that means if you have broken your hubris or have existential queries about the universe, you can give me a call.

I have since relocated to New York University where I am holding a year-long post-doctoral fellowship at the Taub Center for Israel Studies. In the spring semester, I will be teaching a course on Israeli Territorial Politics, and over the summer, I will be teaching a course on Israeli Politics in Comparative Perspective. In the meantime, I am settling into life in the big city, working on conference and journal articles, beginning to prepare my dissertation into a book manuscript, and getting involved with the activities of my center and NYU’s political science department.

I am also now entering the academic job market, which means sending off many many applications to universities around the country, preparing job talks, refining my c.v., and generally trying to sound smart and professional. All of this means that this blog will, in all likelihood, continue to remain somewhat dormant, although I will post about my academic activities as they happen. As always, thanks for staying tuned for my infrequent updates and please feel free to drop me a line here at my new academic home at NYU.


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